SJSU/MLML aquaculture research highlighted in new CSU article

In the next 30 years, global seafood demand is expected to grow 30 percent; aquaculture is expected to meet nearly all of this increased global demand. Researchers and students at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories are on the forefront of the growing sustainable aquaculture movement in the US.

A recent article from California State University highlights some of our ongoing aquaculture research projects including Olympia oyster restoration and the use of seaweed to reduce methane emissions from cows. Check out the article here to learn more about SJSU/MLML aquaculture research.

SJSU/MLML aquaculture researchers help restore native Olympia oysters to Elkhorn Slough

The first effort to use aquaculture to restore native Olympia oysters in California has proven a success thanks to a team of researchers from San Jose State University/MLML, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, and California Sea Grant.

Once so abundant that they could be harvested by the tens of thousands in just a few days, the population of oysters in Elkhorn Slough had plummeted to fewer than 1,000 individuals by 2018. In response to this decline, researchers raised thousands of oysters at the MLML Aquaculture Facility which were then outplanted in Elkhorn Slough. Two years of monitoring have shown that this effort successfully doubled the Olympia oyster population!

SJSU/MLML Research Faculty Member Dr. Luke Gardner reviews the success of this exciting project and the importance on conservation aquaculture in this California Sea Grant story. The results from this project were also published in a scientific journal article in Biological Conservation.

MLML Aquaculture Facility featured in Monterey Herald

The SJSU/MLML Aquaculture Facility was featured in the latest issue of the Monterey Herald! Drs. Michael Graham and Luke Gardner were both interviewed regarding the future of aquaculture and the impacts of Covid-19 on the industry. The MLML Aquaculture Facility aims to develop novel technologies for enhancing the sustainability and productivity of current aquaculture practices through research, education, and policy initiatives.

Read the Monterey Herald article, titled "Is pandemic giving aquaculture a jump start?", here.