Dr. Cailliet (MLML Faculty Emeritus) quoted in a National Geographic article on the challenges of aging sharks

How long do sharks live?  Recent studies using carbon radioisotopes suggest we've been underestimating the ages of sharks, especially older ones.  An article by National Geographic quotes our ichthyologist emeritus, Dr. Gregor Cailliet on the challenges of aging sharks using calcified growth bands:

Gregor Cailliet, professor emeritus at California's Moss Landing Marine Laboratories who has been aging sharks since the 1970s, says the banding method leads to the good, bad, and the ugly.

“The good are the ones where the growth zones and validated ages are identical. The bad is when they don’t mean anything. The ugly are the ones in which there are discrepancies.”

Read the full article here.

Marine Heat Wave Impacts Bull Kelp Forest Ecosystems in Northern California

Dr. Laura Rogers-Bennett, UC Davis Bodega Marine Lab
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - November 16, 2017

Hosted by the Fisheries and Conservation Biology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

Dr. Laura Rogers-Bennett completed her Ph.D. in Ecology at the University of California, Davis and two post-doctoral fellowships one at U.C. Santa Cruz’s, Institute of Marine Science and the other at the U. Washington’s, Friday Harbor Labs. Dr. Rogers-Bennett is a Senior Environmental Scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife in the Marine Region working at the U.C. Bodega Marine Lab. The work in her lab focuses on marine invertebrate population dynamics, fishery management and marine conservation. In the lab they use an interdisciplinary approach combining field, laboratory and quantitative modeling to examine questions related to recruitment dynamics, MPAs, marine conservation biology, fisheries sustainability, ecosystem tipping points and climate change.

MLML’s Dr. Graham & Dr. Hamilton win a highly competitive federal funding award

Dr. Mike Graham and Dr. Scott Hamilton have been awarded a grant with California Sea Grant to research sustainable aquaculture techniques integrating seaweeds and shellfish here at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.  The grant is one of 32 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Sea Grant Program

Read more on this award as announced by California Sea Grant and in an article in the Monterey Herald.

Aquaponics research at Humboldt State University

Dr. Rafael Cuevas Uribe, Humboldt State University
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar series - November 9, 2017

Hosted by the Phycology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

Dr. Rafael Cuevas Uribe is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Fisheries Biology at Humbolt State University.  He received a PhD in Wildlife and Fisheries from Louisiana State University, a MS in Aquaculture/Aquatic Science from Kentucky State University, and a BS in Biology from Universidad de Guadalajara.

Thesis Defense by Martin Guo – November 30th, 2017

Metabarcoding analyses on red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) gut microfloral compositions under different macroalgal diets

A Thesis Defense by Martin Guo

Invertebrate Zoology Lab

Thursday, November 30th, 2017 at 12pm

MLML Seminar Room

Martin Guo came to the United States in 2006 from China and went to high schools in Kentucky and California. He received his bachelor's degree in marine biology at Hawaii Pacific University where he has worked in the Chemical Oceanography Lab at Oceanic Institute and volunteered at UH Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology to learn some basic molecular biology techniques. He joined the MLML community in 2013 and has worked under Dr. Geller's California Non-indigenous Invertebrates Survey (CalNIS) project in the Invertebrate Zoology Lab since then. In addition to the academic aspects of his life, he likes to watch and play soccer, and FC Barcelona is his favorite club team.

Thesis Abstract:

Red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) gut microfloral compositions and growth were investigated and compared under a feeding experiment from May to October in 2016 at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. The treatments were starvation and fresh macroalgal diets (Macrocystis pyriferaPalmaria mollis, and Ulva lectuca). Abalone shell length (SL in cm) and wet in-shell mass (g) were measured for growth comparisons across treatments. In addition, gut samples at buccal cavity, intestine, and stomach as well as seawater and macroalgal diet tissue samples were also collected monthly for 16S rRNA Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Red abalone SL did not have a significant change over the entire feeding experiment, but their wet in-shell mass increased significantly as the red macroalgae fed animals were heavier than the other 2 diet treatments since September 2016 (one-way ANOVA test, F(2,12)=6.4, p=0.013). Furthermore, the metabarcoding assay has detected 17981 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from all samples. Gut microflorall composition was significantly different across treatments at class (PERMANOVA test, F(3,211)=8.55, p=0.001) and genus (PERMANOVA test, F(3,211)=8.44, p=0.001) levels at a rarefaction depth of 13065 OTUs per sample. Gut microfloral composition was also significantly different at the 3 gut regions at class (PERMANOVA test, F(2,212)=79.76, p=0.001) and genus (PERMANOVA test, F(2,212)=60.27, p=0.001) levels. ProteobacteriaBacteroidetesFusobacteria, and Cyanobacteria were dominant taxa in most of the samples. Moreover, SIMPER dissimilarity percentage analysis showed the gut microfloral composition between P. mollis-fed and M. pyrifera-fed, P. mollis-fed and Ulva. spp.-fed, and M. pyrifera-fed and U. spp.-fed abalones were respectively 39.76%, 40.15%, and 42.15% at phylum level. Microfloral composition between the stomach and intestine samples was more similar (36.53%) than between mouth and stomach samples (50.15%) and between mouth and intestine samples (48.68%) at phylum level. To date, this is the first study comparing gut microfloral compositions in red abalone under various macroalgal diets using Illumina sequencing technique. The gut microfloral metabarcoding results could be compared to that of other abalone species or other invertebrates. This work will enhance our understanding of the gut microfloral composition in red abalone which is essential for abalone farmers to support the production of quality juveniles for aquaculture and restoration purposes.

Thesis Defense by Stephan Bitterwolf – November 3rd, 2017

Physiological effects of nitrate, light, and intertidal position on the red seaweeds Mazzaella flaccida and Mazzaella splendens

A Thesis Defense by Stephan A. Bitterwolf

Phycology Lab

Friday, November 3rd at 12pm

MLML Seminar Room

Thesis Abstract:

California’s intertidal seaweeds Mazzaella flaccida and Mazzaella splendens reside in different intertidal zones. The yellow-green M. flaccida is found in the high- and mid-intertidal, while the brown-purple M. splendens is found in the mid- and low-intertidal. These differences in intertidal position and blade color, in addition to minute differences in morphology, are typically used to differentiate these species in the field. However, a reciprocal transplant study by Foster (1982) found that, not only can M. flaccida and M. splendens reside in each other’s zone, but the color of M. splendens can change to the yellow-green of M. flaccida. Thus, Foster (1982) suggested that these two species may be conspecifics. Presently, genetic evidence supports the separation of both species, however, little progress has been made towards determining the cause, mechanism, and impact of this chromatic plasticity on thallus physiology. The present study serves to further our understanding of this chromatic plasticity in Mazzaella through a series of field and laboratory experiments. In the field experiment, 360 individuals (180 of each species, 90 controls and 90 experimental) were reciprocally transplanted within the intertidal zones of 3 central California sites. Thereafter, transplants were monitored monthly from June – October for blade size and presence. In October, all transplants were removed for pigment analysis. In the laboratory experiments pigment concentrations of both species were quantified from seaweeds cultured in reduced or replete irradiances and nitrate concentrations. Differences in blade size, pigment composition, and survival between site, intertidal zone, species, and culture treatment were investigated with 2-way ANOVAs and non-parametric tests. In these experiments: (1) greening was documented only for seaweeds in the culture experiments, (2) survival was greatest in the low intertidal zone, (3) high intertidal seaweeds contained greater photoprotective pigment content, (4) M. flaccida exhibited increased capacity to regulate photoprotective pigments, and 5) M. splendens exhibited increased capacity of phycobilin pigments. The results of this study illustrate how these intertidal seaweeds can survive adverse conditions such as nutrient limitation or increased light stress/desiccation by cannibalizing phycobiliproteins and increasing photoprotective pigments. The differing extent of each species to regulate photoprotective and phycobilin pigments supports their current classification as separate species.

Acknowledgements from Stephan: This work would not have been possible without the support I received from mentors, labmates, students, family, and friends. Thanks all :D!

Funding: NSF GRFP, Myers Trust, and MLML Wave.

CDFW Permit: #13419

“pH”ingerprinting coastal oceans: connecting climate change, natural variability, and biological feedbacks

Dr. Nyssa Silbiger, CSU Northridge
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar series - November 2, 2017

Hosted by the Geological Oceanography Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

Dr. Nyssa Silbiger is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at CSUN.  She did her postdoc at UC Irvine, PhD at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Masters at UNC Chapel Hill, and Bachelors at Florida State University.  During her PhD, she was a NOAA Dr. Nancy Foster Scholar.  Her research broadly focuses on understanding interactions between anthropogenic stressors and natural variability on ecosystem processes.

IT Help Desk Administrator (Temporary)

Temp IT Help Desk Administrator

Start Date: November 15, 2017 (open until filled)
Location: Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
8272 Moss Landing Rd. Moss Landing, CA 95039
Salary: $20/hour
Work Schedule: Full Time, M-F 8am-5pm


Moss Landing Marine Labs (MLML), a department within the College of Science at San Jose State University, is seeking a temporary (6-12 months) Help Desk Administrator to join the Information Technology (IT) department.

 
The MLML IT Help Desk Administrator is assigned to the MLML IT Help Desk and provides related services, as well as directly supports the MLML websites. The IT Help Desk Administrator works directly with faculty, staff, students, researchers and guests in resolving computer, hardware, network, and other related issues. Additionally, the IT Help Desk Administrator assigns tickets to Student Assistants working as IT Help Desk technicians and ensures issues are resolved in a timely manner.
 
Duties:
  • Administer the Help Desk and related services
  • Support Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux users
  • Support the MLML websites including WordPress, web-based applications, and legacy websites
  • Maintain and support desktop hardware including printers and other peripherals
  • Install, configure, and troubleshoot standard supported operating systems
  • Install and configure Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Cloud, JMP, SAS, MatLab, ArcGis, SPSS and other specialized software
  • Ensure the IT Knowledge Base is current and accurate
Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
  • Working knowledge of Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux Operating Systems
  • Working knowledge of workstation and laptop hardware
  • Working knowledge of Windows command prompt, Mac/Linux/Unix CLI
  • Ability to manage and configure numerous makes and models of printers, projectors, and other peripherals
  • Ability to install and configure standard software and operating systems
  • Ability to lift 50lbs
Qualifications:
  • Bachelor’s degree in computer science, information systems, educational technology, communications, or related fields, or similar certified coursework in applicable fields of study
Preferred Qualifications:
  • Previous experience working at an IT Help desk
  • Experience with technical (IT) troubleshooting
  • Experience with WordPress and other web applications
  • Experience with Windows PowerShell is a plus
  • Experience with Google Apps

How To Apply:
Please submit your resume to:

Kathleen Donahue
Assistant to the Director
Academic Programs & Operations
kdonahue@mlml.calstate.edu

 
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