Dr. Richard Starr and Dr. Scott Hamilton receive funding from the California Ocean Protection Council for their work on MPAs

At its May 23 meeting, the California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) unanimously approved seven research projects totaling $9.5 million in funding through the Marine Protected Area Monitoring Program.Two projects lead but Moss Landing PIs Dr. Scott Hamilton and Dr. Richard Starr are among those who were chosen for this opportunity.

Dr. Dave Ebert to participate in Holland Lifelong Learning panel

We are thrilled to share, that our director of the Pacific Shark Research Center, Dr. David Ebert, will be on the panel of the upcoming SOLD OUT Holland Lifelong Learning Finale & Dinner about the World of Wonder: What Lies Beneath.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This lecture series, held at South Carolina Aquarium, allows you to explore top issues in conservation, research and science. These expert-led discussions are geared toward adults in a relaxed social environment. Other participants include Fabien Cousteau of the famed ocean conservationist Cousteau family; the National Geographic Emerging Explorer, Dr. Grace C. Young as well as their science reporter, Dr. Nadia Drake; and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research coordinator, Dr. Daniel Wagner.

Mary Papazian nominated as one of 2019’s Women of The Year

Moss Landing Marine Labs congratulates San Jose State University President, Mary Papazian, for being one of 2019's Women of The Year, as nominated by the California Legislature. The Woman of the Year event was founded in 1987 in celebration of Women's History Month. Every March, senators and assembly members invite women to the Capitol who are making a difference in their communities throughout the state.

Dr. Michael Graham’s land-based seaweed farm is in high demand

MLML's Dr. Michael Graham has been earning some well-deserved attention for his innovative land-based seaweed farm. Monterey Bay Seaweeds provides seaweed for many high-end restaurants in the area. Chefs and foodies alike are raving about the seaweed grown at the farm. An article by the "Grub Hunter," Mike Hale in the Monterey Bay Herald dives in to what makes this seaweed so special.

Excerpt:

“The original idea was to see how our family could maybe do some seaweed farming,” said Graham. “We ran into a few hurdles and eventually built a market that never existed — edible seaweed delivered live and raw, in seawater, not modified in any way, fresh out of the ocean.”
Chef Justin Cogley from Carmel’s Aubergine, arguably the finest restaurant on the Peninsula, has Graham on speed dial.
“We use ogo, dulse, sea lettuce … anything else he finds or grows,” Cogley said. “To work with Dr. G, who is the foremost authority on seaweed, has helped us have a consistent product.”

To read more, you can find the article here

Listen Up! Our grad students are doing some awesome outreach

Listen Up!

Brijonnay Madrigal is a student in the Vertebrate Ecology Lab who studies bioacoustics of Risso's Dolphins in the Monterey Bay.  To share her love and knowledge of the incredible sounds of marine mammals, Brijonnay has developed an outreach program in the Monterey Bay area. "Listen Up!" is an interactive program that teaches K-12 students about marine mammals, acoustics, sounds in the ocean, and conservation. The program has already reaches 10 elementary schools, 1 middle school, and 10 high schools in the area.

 

Alison Stimpert gives insight on government shutdown

January 11, 2019

MLML's Dr. Alison Stimpert talks about how the government shut down is affecting scientists in this NPR article.

Excerpt:

Alison Stimpert, a marine biologist with California State University, writes, "Even though I am continuing to work, many of my collaborators (USGS, NOAA) are furloughed and projects we are working on together cannot move forward." She says that means "project planning meetings are being delayed, as well as permit applications for upcoming work."
Stimpert studies bioacoustics — "acoustic behavior and effects of noise on marine species," she explains — in waters off of California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Alaska and Antarctica. She says that in some cases, the shutdown means she may have to reorganize some travel or wait to start a phase of research until collaborators can work. In other areas, it might have more serious implications: "We might miss an opportunity to deploy an instrument, which makes us miss collecting an entire season of data." And Stimpert says that if she or her collaborators have future federal funding delays, it could mean that "I can't purchase an instrument that I need, but might (and I am not alone in this) mean my other funding runs out and I can no longer fund my position, making me lose my benefits."

Sea Otter Savvy joins MLML as a research affiliate

Sea Otter Savvy joins the MLML family

We are proud to announce that Sea Otter Savvy is now officially a research affiliate of Moss Landing Marine Labs. The Sea Otter Savvy program strives to foster responsible behavior by users of the marine environment while they are viewing and recreating near sea otters. Sea Otter Savvy believes that most disturbance to sea otters is unintentional and motivated by lack of awareness. It is essential to understand the unique vulnerability and importance of sea otters in our ecosystem in order to prevent disturbance. With outreach and education, we hope to increase awareness of the importance of protecting sea otters as part of our coastal community, and inspire everyone sharing the coastal environment with sea otters to adopt responsible viewing guidelines and share them with others.