Drivers of biogeochemical variability in a kelp forest in southern Monterey Bay and beyond – January 23rd

Yui Takeshita, Monterey Bay Aquarium research Institute
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - January 23rd, 2020

Hosted by The Chemical Oceanography Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

Submerged aquatic vegetation such as seagrass beds and kelp forests have been proposed as a potential strategy to locally ameliorate impacts of ocean acidification. However, kelp forests are known to thrive in highly dynamic systems, where chemical conditions are controlled by a complex interaction of physical and biological drivers. Thus, in order to accurately assess the potential and limitations for this strategy, we must first quantify the underlying natural processes that drive its variability. In this talk, I will present a paired-mooring experiment conducted in the summer of 2018 where a mooring was deployed inside and outside of the kelp forest right outside of Hopkins Marine Lab. The moorings were instrumented with pH and O2 sensors that provided high vertical resolution. The results will be discussed in the context of this kelp forest's potential to curb acidification stress, and how this site compares to others along the California coast. 

My main research interests are focused on developing and applying new autonomous biogeochemical sensing technology. I use these new instruments to study various marine processes, especially in the coastal ocean where impacts of ocean change are felt most strongly by society. For example, we have used moored instrumentation to make habitat specific ocean acidification predictions in Southern California, and developed benthic flux systems to measure net calcification rates on coral reefs as a proxy for reef health. Currently our group is working on improving benthic flux systems for long term, sustained measurements; studying high frequency dynamics in coastal systems such as coral reefs, kelp forests, and sea grass beds; operating pH sensors on underwater gliders; and refining our thermodynamic model of CO2 chemistry in seawater to establish robust calibration protocols for pH sensors on autonomous sensor networks such as gliders and profiling floats. 

I have been a scientist at MBARI since 2017. I received my Ph.D. at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego under Todd Martz, and did a postdoc under Ken Caldeira at the Carnegie Institution for Science 

I also hold an adjunct faculty position in the Ocean Sciences (link: https://oceansci.ucsc.edu/) department at the University of California Santa Cruz. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carbon Fluxes and Ocean Acidification During the Paleocene-Eocene – January 30th

Jim Zachos, UCSC
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - January 30th, 2020

Hosted by The Geological Oceanography Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

~More information to come~

 

Jim Zachos's research interests encompass a wide variety of problems related to the biological, chemical, and climatic evolution of late Cretaceous and Cenozoic oceans. He measures the chemical composition of shells from marine sediments to reconstruct past changes in ocean temperature & circulation, continental ice-volume, productivity, and carbon cycling. His research is oriented toward identifying the mechanisms responsible for driving long and short-term changes in global climate.

Zachos, his students, and colleagues are currently participating in several projects oriented toward understanding the nature of rapid and extreme climate transitions in earth's past. These projects involve the application of stable isotope and trace metal ratios to reconstruct the ocean temperature and chemistry for several episodes of extreme climates including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (~56 mya), the middle- and early Eocene Climatic Optimums, as well as subsequent long-term cooling trends. This also includes work to quantify rare episodes of ocean acidification (acid oceans) that accompanied several of the transient warmings. He is also utilizing sediment archives to establish the approximate timing and extent of continental glaciations during the Oligocene and Miocene epochs (between 15 to 35 million years ago).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate change impacts on kelp forest ecosystems on the California Current region – February 6th

Fiorenza Micheli, Hopkins Marine Station
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - February 6th, 2020

Hosted by The Phycology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

~More information to come~

 

 

Fiorenza Micheli is a marine ecologist and conservation biologist conducting research and teaching at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, where she is the David and Lucile Packard Professor of Marine Science and the co-director, with Jim Leape, of Center for Ocean Solutions (www.centerforoceansolutions.org). Micheli’s research focuses on the processes shaping marine communities and incorporating this understanding in the management and conservation of marine ecosystems. Her current research projects investigate social and ecological drivers of the resilience of small-scale fisheries to climatic impacts in Baja California, Mexico, the ecological and socioeconomic impacts of coastal hypoxia and ocean acidification in the California Current large marine ecosystem, the ecological role and spatial ecology of parrotfish and reef sharks in the coral reefs of the Pacific Line Islands, the effects of ocean acidification on seagrass, rocky reef and kelp forest communities, and the performance and management of marine protected Areas in the Mediterranean Sea. She is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation, a fellow of the California Academy of Sciences, and senior fellow at Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment.

Watch Fiorenza’s MLML Seminar Presentation Below:

What does blue mud tell us about subduction? – February 13th

 
 

Geoff Wheat, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Presenting: What does blue mud tell us about seduction?

Hosted by The Chemical Oceanography Lab

MLML Seminar Room | February 13th, 2020 at 4pm

Open to the public

 

Geoff Wheat uses chemical tracers to understand processes that influence the cycle of elements in the oceans. Much of this work focuses on the transport of fluids through the oceanic crust in a range of settings including hydrothermal systems on mid-ocean ridges and flanks and seepage sites along zones of subduction and in coastal environments. Studies typically include sampling and analyzing fluids and solids, developing transport-reaction models, and relating results to biogeochemical cycles and crustal evolution. Wheat has participated on 79 ocean expeditions of which 49 included a submersible or ROV component. On 26 of these cruises Wheat was either the Chief Scientist or one of two Co-Chief Scientists. Wheat also has participated on two legs of the Ocean Drilling Program and seven expeditions of the Integrated (International) Ocean Drilling (Discovery) Program (IODP).

Abstract:

The Mariana forearc is home to tens of active serpentinite mud volcanoes, which are the largest mud volcanoes on Earth, some spanning 50 km in diameter and kilometers high. These mud volcanoes form at the intersection of faults in a non-accretionary forearc prism. Such faults permit fluids, muds, clasts, and rocks to be transported from the subduction channel to the seafloor. Because these active serpentinite mud volcanoes are located at different distances from the trench, they are supplied by material that originates at a range of depths, temperatures, and pressures within the subduction channel. Thus, serpentinite mud volcanoes are windows into the subduction channel, allowing us to characterize physical, thermal, chemical, and microbial processes within a subduction channel. 

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Watch Geoff’s MLML Seminar Presentation Below:

Evolution of bioluminescence in the sea – February 20th

Manabu Bessho, Monterey Bay Research Institute
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - February 20th, 2020

Hosted by The Invertebrate Zoology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

~More information to come~

 

 

Manabu earned his PhD in Bioagricultural Sciences from Nagoya University, Japan; where he also received his Masters and Bachelor degrees. Manabu’s research interests are in bioluminescence, evolutionary novelty, and evolutionary developmental biology. At MBARI, Manabu’s fellowship will focus on important questions in deep-sea bioluminescence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Field Immersion: how curiosity, natural history and collaboration has led to ecological discoveries along the Californias – February 27th

Diana Steller, MLML/SJSU
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - February 27th, 2020

Hosted by The Phycology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

My broad research interests include the ecology of temperate, subtropical, and carbonate rhodolith reefs with an emphasis on macroalgal ecology, algal physiology and species interactions. I am particularly interested in the role that macroalgae play as a substrate and food resource in subtidal communities and how algal dynamics influence community dynamics.   My research in California kelp forests has focused on examining species interactions with a particular interest in dynamics of the algal community.  Another major area of interest has been examining the distribution, dynamics and ecological role that rhodolith beds play in the north eastern Pacific Ocean.  Rhodoliths are unattached, coralline algae that form large, structured, aggregated habitats on coastal sedimentary bottoms.  This is an understudied ecosystem and I have been involved with developing collaborative research between MLML and CSU faculty and students and Mexican researchers to help better understand the ecology of this system in Pacific Mexico and the Pacific Northeast.  Currently, I am involved with CA Seagrant funded research in California to explore the production and foundational role of rhodolith beds around Catalina Island.  This research aims to develop a suite of metrics to measure with the goal of describing their current status in CA for potential protection.  I am interested in the growth and recovery of carbonate reefs in the past, present and future.  I take M.S. students that are interested in subtidal marine ecology and pushing themselves to develop as experimental, subtidal scientists.

Diana Steller Presents: How curiosity, natural history and collaboration has led to ecological discoveries along the Californias

The politics of sea level rise – March 5th

Kate Sammler, Cal State Maritime
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - March 5th, 2020

Hosted by The Geological Oceanography Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

Sea level rise has destructive material impacts on coastal communities and low-lying nations. While it is largely perceived and experienced via these impacts, the level of the sea is less often thought about as a political surface. The boundary where land and sea intersect is determined by the ocean’s height, manifesting materially as a realm of coastal features and produced politically as baselines. Defined through international treaties, baselines are the low-water line upon which national boundaries are traced. Yet, this line between adjoining mediums of land and sea is much more physically blurred and dynamic than represented politically and legally. The difficulties of delimiting a coastline, a phenomenon referred to as the Coastline Paradox, means the measurement of a coastline is dependent on the ruler used, an entanglement of instrument and measurement. As rising sea levels encroach on physical coastlines, they are also impacting legal baselines, shifting national terrestrial and maritime borders inland posing existential dilemmas to island and low-lying nations. This paper examines how the concept of sea level was constructed scientifically and is enrolled in the legal demarcation of territorial borders, with the goal of examining how sea level rise politically marks a climatically changing world.

 

 

Dr. Katherine Sammler is trained as a geographer, with a background in atmospheric science and physics. She is currently an assistant professor at California State University Maritime in the department of Global Studies & Maritime Affairs. She conducts research at the intersection of science and politics in the realm of oceans, atmospheres, and outer space. In all areas, her work considers the role of knowledge, law, and power in defining global commons, access, and environmental justice. She has recently published on the politics of seabed mining and indigenous rights in New Zealand, and public versus private rights to offplanet resources at the Spaceport America launch site in New Mexico. She is currently conducting research on astronomy and space infrastructure in Hawaii in relation to settler colonial observation and occupation.

Kate Sammler Presents: The Politics of Sea Level Rise

CANCELLED: Sea level rise vulnerability of natural and human coastal ecosystems – March 12

Ross Clark, MLML and Central Coast Wetlands Group
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - March 12th, 2020

Hosted by The Invertebrate Ecology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

~More info coming soon!~ 

 

 

 

Ross Clark has 20 years of experience drafting and implementing California’s Nonpoint Source Control Program both as a university researcher and as state agency staff. He is currently charged with developing regional programs to improve the restoration and management of state wetland resources and implementing programs to reduce nutrient loading to Central Coast surface waters.  Ross manages a team of field scientists supporting the development and implementation of the State’s wetland monitoring program and the integration of wetland restoration activities into regional and State water quality and land use planning efforts. Since 2008 he has also been tasked with developing the City of Santa Cruz strategic plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and identify key threats from, and appropriate responses to climate change and sea level rise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CANCELLED – The Age and Growth of an MLML Ichthyology Alum: 20 years in and around the Pacific Groundfish fishery – March 26th

Melissa Mahoney, Environmental Defense Fund
Moss Landing Marine Labs Seminar Series - March 26th, 2020

Hosted by The Ichthyology Lab

MLML Seminar Room, 4pm

Open to the public

~More info coming soon!~ 

 

 

Melissa’s fisheries background spans across academic, governmental, and non-profit sectors. She has performed a wide variety of fisheries research projects including age and growth studies of rockfish, fishery sustainability and markets, socio-economic analyses, geo-spatial mapping and qualitative ethnographic research.Early in her career, Melissa developed a fisheries education project for Monterey Bay area youth (now run by NOAA’s Sanctuary Program), and most recently a documentary film to tell the stories of California’s commercial fishermen (www.oftheseamovie.com).

Prior to joining EDF’s team, Melissa worked for The Nature Conservancy of CA, forming collaborative partnerships with fishermen to test new co-management techniques, market-based incentives, and monitoring technologies for improved fisheries management. Melissa currently serves as Steering Committee member to the National EM Working Group and as an Advisor to the Monterey Bay Fisheries Trust, a local non-profit serving the commercial fishing industry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Webinar – Ocean ecology of steelhead as revealed by pop-up satellite archival tags – April 9th

Emily A. Miller, Monterey Bay Aquarium
Presenting: "Ocean ecology of steelhead as revealed by pop-up satellite archival tags"

MLML Webinar |April 9th, 2020 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream Here!

 

Emily is interested in how the interactions between organisms and their environment change over space and time. She especially enjoys research questions that help us understand migration ecology and that inform the conservation of California species and ecosystems. Her tools of choice to answer these questions are biotelemetry and stable isotope ecology. Emily is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Conservation Research Department at Monterey Bay Aquarium, where she has worked for the past two years. In this position, she has worked on several projects studying the historical ecology of sea turtles and marine macroalgae, fish ocean movements, and fisheries. Before joining the Monterey Bay Aquarium, she graduated with a PhD in Ecology from U.C. Davis and a Masters from Columbia University in Conservation Biology. Her dissertation involved tagging and tracking green and white sturgeon in the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento River to examine spatial niche partitioning. Emily is also interested in communicating science to a wide audience though data visualizations and art.

Watch Emily Miller’s Remote MLML Seminar Below: