MLML Welcomes Dr. Geoff Wheat

MLML welcomes Dr. Geoff Wheat from the University of Alaska!  He brings with him Claudia Paul and Trevor Fournier. Geoff uses tracers to understand processes that influence the cycle of elements in the oceans.  Much of his work focuses on the transport of fluids through the oceanic crust in a range of settings including hydrothermal systems on mid-ocean ridges and flanks and seepage sites along zones of subduction and in coastal environments.  Studies typically include sampling and analyzing fluids and solids, developing transport-reaction models, and relating results to geochemical cycles and crustal evolution. I also runs Seafloor Science ROV Day Camp,  a STEM-based summer camp for students entering 3-5th grades and 6-9th grades.
Geoff and his team will be working out of 502 in the Main Building and operating the ICPMS.  You might also find Geoff in his office over in the faculty wing.  Throughout the process of bringing him onboard, Geoff has expressed his eagerness and enthusiasm to meet and work with our students.  Please join me in welcoming Geoff, Claudia and Trevor to MLML!

Ross Clark talks aquaculture and methane emissions in new article

Ross Clark, director of the Central Coast Wetlands Group at Moss Landing Marine Labs and regular contributor the the Santa Cruz Sentinel, has a new article out! For this piece, Mr. Clark highlights MLML scientists, aiming to reduce methane emissions through aquaculture. Read more here.

Excerpt

Scientists at Moss Landing Marine Labs aquaculture center hope recently initiated research will have the potential to revitalize the dairy industry while simultaneously propelling the algal aquaculture industry and simultaneously reducing U.S. dairies carbon emissions. Recent research has shown that changes in feeding strategies, such as supplemental seaweed feed additives (used at 1-2 percent of feed material) can reduce methane production from cattle by up to 99 percent.

Current success in reducing methane has been through the use of a warm water non-native algae species added to the feed. Moss Landing scientists are hoping to identify local species that can perform the same function and can be grown locally without risk of introducing invasive species to our marine environment.