MLML’s Holly Bowers is Using Exciting New Technology

MLML Researcher Holly Bowers is Using Exciting New Technology!

GenomeWeb recently published an article about Ubiquitome's newest portable qPCR platform.  Ubiquitome is commercializing a 16-well real-time PCR instrument that is aimed at personalizing the method and making it more accessible to researchers. Their new Liberty16 instrument is designed to be easily used in the field. MLML Research Faculty Holly Bowers recently won California Sea Grant funding from the Ocean Protection Council Proposition 84 to study toxic algae using the Liberty16.

"Bowers' new funding will allow her group to take the Liberty16 into the field, and do PCR 'boatside, or shoreside,' she said, to detect different algae species in the water and to support local stakeholders. Boatside, and even 'tankside' research is much like bedside genomics, in which a clinician runs a test right next to a patient, she said. 'This takes us, as algal scientists, into that realm of thinking.' "

To read more about how researchers are using this new technology you can read the full article here.

MLML Research Faculty Receive Competitive OPC Grants

Two MLML researchers have received grants from the California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) through the Proposition 84 Competitive Grants Program.

The research projects were selected through a competitive process based on criteria developed by OPC in alignment with its mission and priorities. California Sea Grant and the University of Southern California Sea Grant facilitated the review panel process and will administer project grants on behalf of OPC.

Read about Research Faculty Dr. Holly Bowers's project:

Advancing Portable Detection Capabilities of HAB Species in California Waters

 

Read about Research Faculty Dr. Luke Gardner's project:

Sea Feeds: Identification and culture of Californian marine macroalgae capable of reducing greenhouse gas production from ruminant livestock

MLML Research Faculty Dr. Holly Bowers publishes paper on harmful algal blooms in Monterey Bay

MLML congratulates one of our Research Faculty, Dr. Holly A. Bowers, on her just published article on the role of species composition in determining the potential domoic acid toxicity of our frequent Pseudo-nitzschia blooms in the bay.  The article compares across years 2013 and 2015, the latter was part of the superbloom that ultimately caused the closure of crab fisheries along the Pacific coast.  Bowers and her collaborators, including MLML's April Woods and G. Jason Smith, make use of several state of the art sampling platforms and techniques.

See the article Here.