MLML’s Dr. Maxime Grand to speak at UC Santa Cruz – December 7th, 2018

Maxime Grand, MLML's Chemical Oceanographer, to speak in UC Santa Cruz's Ocean Sciences Seminar Series on Friday, December 7th at 10:40am.

Beyond GEOTRACES: From basin-scale micronutrient metal surveys to in situ microfluidic sensing

This talk will explore the biogeochemistry of dissolved and particulate Fe and Al in the Indian Ocean prior to discussing the development and application of emerging analytical technologies for autonomous observations of trace metals and major nutrients (phosphate) using microfluidics.

For more info, click here.

 

Announcing MLML’s New Chemical Oceanographer: Dr. Maxime Grand!

MLML is excited to welcome a new Chemical Oceanography faculty member: Dr. Maxime Grand.  He will be joining us this coming August!

Dr. Maxime Grand is recognized for his work as a chemical oceanographer and analytical chemist. His research interests focus on the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals and nutrients in coastal and open ocean regimes and their biological implications. His analytical work revolves around the development of autonomous microfluidic analyzers, also known as optofluidic sensors, which are well suited to investigate complex nutrient and trace metal dynamics in situ.

Dr. Grand holds a PhD from the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, a MS in Applied Marine Science from the University of Plymouth (UK), a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Science from the University of Auckland (NZ) and a BS in Global Environmental Science from the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. Immediately after completing his academic training, Dr. Grand was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Southampton National Oceanography Centre (UK). Dr. Grand is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, where he is leading the development of a National Science Foundation funded oceanography summer bridge program, which aims to improve the recruitment of underrepresented Native Hawaiian students into baccalaureate geoscience programs.